24 Days of Kitchen Oceanography

GERMAN VERSION BELOW!!!


Usually, we only come into contact with the ocean’s surface or a few meters below it. But the ocean is on average 4km deep and consists of many different layers. When it is cold enough, ice floats on top. In warmer regions, the warmest water is closest to the surface. Underneath, there are many different layers: the colder and saltier the water, the further down the layer is located. Without any external influences, the layers of water rest stably on top of each other and only very slowly mix due to the movement of individual molecules.

Click on the picture to go to the experiment (Link will go live on December 1st, 2019)

But above the water surface there is air, the atmosphere. The temperature of water at the sea surface, as well as its salinity, is constantly changing because of exchanges with the atmosphere. The atmosphere can cool water down or heat it up. In some regions, for example in the Greenland Sea, water becomes so cold – and thus heavy – that it sinks, away from the surface. To replace it, water from other regions is pulled in.

Click on the picture to go to the experiment (Link will go live on December 2nd, 2019)

Water masses of different temperatures, and thus different densities, can partly explain the global oceanic circulation.

Click on the picture to go to the experiment (Link will go live on December 3rd, 2019)

The density of seawater, and thus the movement of currents, is not only influenced by its temperature, but also by its salinity. Rain brings new freshwater into the ocean, which reduces salinity in areas where it rained. When seawater evaporates, it leaves behind the salt. Salt is also left behind when seawater freezes to ice. Both processes therefore locally increase salinity. Sometimes the influence of temperature dominates density, other times salinity does. Therefore, it is not immediately obvious which water mass is denser or less dense, and therefore what kind of currents will form.

Click on the picture to go to the experiment (Link will go live on December 4th, 2019)

In addition, currents are influenced by the shape of coasts and the seabed. Sometimes, for example, ocean basins are separated by oceanic mountain ranges, called ridges. If a reservoir with dense water is formed on one side of such a ridge, it might eventually fill up the whole basin to the level of the lowest part of the ridge. If then any denser water is added, it spills over the ridge and creates an overflow of dense water.

Click on the picture to go to the experiment (Link will go live on December 5th, 2019)

Overflows can happen either continuously as more dense water is formed, or in bursts. At the interface between the dense water that fills the reservoir to threshold level and the less dense water above it, internal waves can form. Waves propagate much slower on this interface than waves on the sea surface do, but otherwise they behave very similarly. When wave crests reach the threshold, dense water is flushed over. Wave troughs lower the level of dense water at the threshold so that little or none of the dense water spills over the ridge.

Click on the picture to go to the experiment (Link will go live on December 6th, 2019)

The overflow itself is “hydraulically controlled”. This means that it only depends on the upstream conditions because the current in the overflow itself is so fast that information about changes in the downstream conditions can’t travel upstream fast enough to have an effect there. Any disturbances are simply flushed away, similarly to a person that is always being brought back down when trying to walk up a downwards running escalator.

Click on the picture to go to the experiment (Link will go live on December 7th, 2019)

Another way in which the shape of a basin can have an effect on flows is through obstacles within a flow. Where exactly and how fast a current is flowing, for example when it flows around obstacles, can be described by streamlines.

Click on the picture to go to the experiment (Link will go live on December 8th, 2019)

Streamlines work best for flows that do not change over time, but they can also show the average conditions for flows that change over time. This is often the case, for example when there are eddies that detach and migrate.

Click on the picture to go to the experiment (Link will go live on December 9th, 2019)

Eddies occur in the ocean for example where the very warm and salty Mediterranean water flows into the Atlantic at mid-depth. There it forms a layer according to its density, between colder and less salty water masses above and below.

Click on the picture to go to the experiment (Link will go live on December 10th, 2019)

These eddies, rotating lenses of water, are called “meddies” (from Mediterranean and eddies) and can transport water (of certain temperature and salinity) over long distances. Eddies can also transport other properties, for example dissolved substances like gases or nutrients, but also plankton or plastic. Due to the fact that eddies rotate around their own axis, a shear flow is created by friction with surrounding water masses, which slowly mixes the inner and the outer bodies of water.

Click on the picture to go to the experiment (Link will go live on December 11th, 2019)

Some substances are transported by ocean currents but have a different density than the water. Therefore, they either float on top (like plastic garbage) or stay near the bottom (like sediment). They accumulate in areas when water rises or sinks, when they can’t keep up because of their different density.

Click on the picture to go to the experiment (Link will go live on December 12th, 2019)

But for dissolved substances, there are many processes that cause mixing. In addition to the “stirring” caused by eddies, for example wind waves on the surface also contribute to mixing.

Click on the picture to go to the experiment (Link will go live on December 13th, 2019)

In the ocean’s interior, mixing between two water masses often occurs when internal tidal waves run at the interface between water masses and hit submarine ridges and break.

Click on the picture to go to the experiment (Link will go live on December 14th, 2019)

Mixing can also happen due to other processes, for example double-diffusive mixing. In the case of double diffusive mixing, two substances mix, because the molecular diffusion of different components happens at different rates. Temperature equilibrates about 100 times faster than salinity. This can lead to unstable density stratifications and therefore vertical movements, which lead to mixing.

Click on the picture to go to the experiment (Link will go live on December 15th, 2019)

Double-diffusive mixing has for example been observed at the lower boundary of the Mediterranean outflow, where warm and salty water is layered above colder and fresher. There, so-called “salt fingers” form, which mix water masses much faster than molecular diffusion could.

Click on the picture to go to the experiment (Link will go live on December 16th, 2019)

A second type of double-diffusive mixing is observed at the upper boundary of the Mediterranean outflow, where colder and less salty water is found above warm and very salty water. Here the process is called “diffusive layering” and convection forms homogeneous layers.

Click on the picture to go to the experiment (Link will go live on December 17th, 2019)

This type of stratification, with colder and fresher water over warmer and saltier water also occurs in the Arctic. There, the stratification is formed by both, precipitation and when sea ice melts during summer. Sea ice, even though originally formed from salty seawater, consists almost exclusively of fresh water.

Click on the picture to go to the experiment (Link will go live on December 18th, 2019)

In the freezing process, the salt is “rejected”. The freezing water molecules create a uniform crystal structure, and the remaining salt water is forced into pores and to the edge of the ice, where it is released into the surrounding water and sinks. Sometimes however, small reservoirs of concentrated salt water are trapped in the ice. Sea ice therefore has a sponge-like structure.

Click on the picture to go to the experiment (Link will go live on December 19th, 2019)

Ice does not only form from liquid water but also from water vapor. The phase transition from gaseous to solid state is called “resublimation” and occurs, for example, in the formation of hoarfrost or snowflakes.

Click on the picture to go to the experiment (Link will go live on December 20th, 2019)

In regions where temperatures are always below freezing, snow deposits in layers over many years, and over centuries develop into a glacier. The layers of a glacier become a climate archive because with every snowfall also information, for example about gas concentrations in the atmosphere or to pollen of the flowering plants, are deposited.

Click on the picture to go to the experiment (Link will go live on December 21st, 2019)

When glaciers melt, as is currently happening due to climate change, water that hasn’t been part of the hydrological cycle of precipitation and evaporation for many years, is returned into this cycle and ends-up in the ocean. This means that “new” water is being added which causes the sea level to rise.

Click on the picture to go to the experiment (Link will go live on December 22nd, 2019)

Ice that already floats in the ocean also melts faster due to the increasingly warmer temperatures of the atmosphere. And not only that, additionally warmer currents gnaw on the ice from below and contribute to the increased melting.

Click on the picture to go to the experiment (Link will go live on December 23rd, 2019)

Melting of sea ice does not contribute to sea level rise by adding additional water as does melting of glaciers. But even warming of already existing water alone contributes to sea-level rise, as warming of water causes an expansion.

Click on the picture to go to the experiment (Link will go live on December 24th, 2019)

Fancy even more #KitchenOceanography? Follow me on Twitter (@meermini) and Instagram (@fascinocean_kiel) or subscribe to my blog (https://mirjamglessmer.com/), then you will be informed about all new experiments when they come!

P.S .: Want even more #KitchenOceanography than that? You can book me for the development or execution of experiments! Contact me via any of the three channels above, I am looking forward to it!



Auch wenn wir normalerweise nur mit der Meeresoberfläche oder einigen wenigen Metern darunter in Berührung kommen: Der Ozean ist durchschnittlich 4km tief und besteht aus vielen verschiedenen Schichten. Wenn es kalt genug ist, schwimmt ganz oben Eis. In warmen Regionen findet man ganz oben das besonders warme Wasser. Darunter sind dann unterschiedliche Wasserschichten angeordnet: Je kälter und salziger das Wasser ist, desto weiter unten findet man es. Ohne äußere Einflüsse würden die Schichten stabil übereinander liegen und sich nur sehr langsam durch die Bewegung der einzelnen kleinen Teilchen vermischen.

Klicke auf das Bild, um zum Experiment zu gelangen (Link wird am 1. Dezember 2019 freigeschaltet)

Aber der Ozean grenzt oben an Luft, die Atmosphäre. Die Temperatur des Wassers, genau wie sein Salzgehalt, wird an der Wasseroberfläche durch Austausch mit der Atmosphäre ständig verändert. Die Atmosphäre kann abkühlen oder erwärmen. Wenn in einer Region gekühlt wird, zum Beispiel in der Grönlandsee, wird das Wasser dort so schwer, dass es absinkt. Dadurch entsteht ein Sog und aus anderen Regionen strömt Wasser nach.

Klicke auf das Bild, um zum Experiment zu gelangen (Link wird am 2. Dezember 2019 freigeschaltet)

Schon alleine die unterschiedlichen Temperaturen verschiedener Wassermassen können die globalen Bewegungen von Ozeanströmungen erklären.

Klicke auf das Bild, um zum Experiment zu gelangen (Link wird am 3. Dezember 2019 freigeschaltet)

Nicht nur die Temperatur, auch der Salzgehalt beeinflusst die Dichte des Meerwassers und damit das Verhalten von Strömungen. Regen bringt Süßwasser in den Ozean, vermindert also den Salzgehalt dort, wo es geregnet hat. Wenn Wasser verdunstet, bleibt Salz zurück, ebenso wenn Meerwasser zu Eis gefriert. Beides hat zur Folge, dass der Salzgehalt dort steigt. Dadurch, dass manchmal der Einfluss der Temperatur, manchmal der Einfluss des Salzgehaltes auf die Dichte überwiegt, ist es nicht sofort offensichtlich, welche von zwei Wassermassen die mit der höheren Dichte ist, und also auch nicht, was für Strömungen sich bilden werden.

Klicke auf das Bild, um zum Experiment zu gelangen (Link wird am 4. Dezember 2019 freigeschaltet)

Zusätzlich werden Strömungen auch durch die Form der Küsten und des Meeresbodens beeinflusst. Manchmal sind Ozeanbecken zum Beispiel weit unter der Wasseroberfläche durch Tiefseegebirgsketten, sogenannte Rücken, voneinander getrennt. Dann kann es passieren, dass auf der einen Seite des Rückens ein Reservoir mit dort gebildetem, dichtem Wasser bis zur Höhe der niedrigsten Stelle des Rückens vollläuft. Wenn dieses Wasser dann durch ein Tal im Rücken überläuft, entsteht ein „Overflow“ des dichten Wassers.

Klicke auf das Bild, um zum Experiment zu gelangen (Link wird am 5. Dezember 2019 freigeschaltet)

Ein Overflow kann kontinuierlich oder auch in Schüben stattfinden. An der Grenzschicht zwischen dem dichten Wasser, mit dem das Reservoir bis zum tiefliegendsten Tal im Rücken aufgefüllt ist, und dem weniger dichten Wasser darüber können Wellen entstehen. Die Wellen an dieser Grenzschicht laufen viel langsamer als Wellen an der Meeresoberfläche, verhalten sich aber ansonsten sehr ähnlich. Mit Wellenkämmen, die den Rücken erreichen, wird dichtes Wasser über den Rücken gespült, während in Wellentälern der Stand des dichten Wassers am Rücken sinkt und weniger oder gar kein dichtes Wasser über die Schwelle schwappt.

Klicke auf das Bild, um zum Experiment zu gelangen (Link wird am 6. Dezember 2019 freigeschaltet)

Der Overflow selbst wird dabei „hydraulisch kontrolliert“. Das bedeutet, dass der Overflow nur von den Bedingungen stromaufwärts, wie zum Beispiel den Wellen an der Genzschicht, abhängt. Die Strömung im Overflow selbst ist so schnell, dass Informationen über Änderungen der Bedingungen stromabwärts nicht schnell genug stromaufwärts wandern können, um dort einen Effekt zu haben. Sie werden auf ihrem Weg stromaufwärts einfach weggespült, wie wenn man versucht, eine nach unten fahrende Rolltreppe nach oben zu gehen.

Klicke auf das Bild, um zum Experiment zu gelangen (Link wird am 7. Dezember 2019 freigeschaltet)

Eine andere Art, wie die Form des Beckens Strömungen beeinflussen kann, sind Hindernisse, die umflossen werden. Stromlinien beschreiben genau, wo eine Strömung entlang fließt und wie schnell sie ist, zum Beispiel wenn sie um Hindernisse herum fließt.

Klicke auf das Bild, um zum Experiment zu gelangen (Link wird am 8. Dezember 2019 freigeschaltet)

Stromlinien funktionieren am besten für Strömungen, die sich über die Zeit nicht ändern. Stromlinien können aber auch die durchschnittliche Strömung beschreiben für Fälle, wenn sich Strömungen mit der Zeit ändern. Das ist oft der Fall, zum Beispiel immer dann, wenn irgendwo Wirbel entstehen, die sich ablösen und wandern.

Klicke auf das Bild, um zum Experiment zu gelangen (Link wird am 9. Dezember 2019 freigeschaltet)

Wirbel entstehen im Ozean beinahe überall. Zum Beispiel dort, wo das sehr warme und salzige Mittelmeerwasser in mittlerer Tiefe in den Atlantik fließt. Dort schichtet es sich seiner Dichte entsprechend zwischen kälteren und weniger salzigen Wassermassen darüber und darunter ein.

Klicke auf das Bild, um zum Experiment zu gelangen (Link wird am 10. Dezember 2019 freigeschaltet)

Diese als Wasserlinsen rotierenden Wirbel werden “Meddies” (von M(ittelmeer) und Eddies = Wirbel) genannt und können über weite Strecken Wasser, und damit auch die Eigenschaften der Wassermasse, transportieren. Mit dem Wasser in Wirbeln werden – neben Temperatur und Salzgehalt – auch andere Dinge bewegt. Das können gelöste Stoffe sein wie Gase oder Nährstoffe, aber auch Plankton oder Plastik. Dadurch, dass die Eddies um ihre eigene Achse rotieren, wird das Wasser durch Reibung mit umgebenden Wassermassen verformt, so dass sich die innere und die äußere Wassermasse langsam miteinander vermischt.

Klicke auf das Bild, um zum Experiment zu gelangen (Link wird am 11. Dezember 2019 freigeschaltet)

Stoffe, die mit Meeresströmungen transportiert werden, aber eine andere Dichte als das umgebende Wasser haben, schwimmen entweder oben (wie Plastikmüll) oder bleiben in der Nähe des Grundes (wie Sediment). Sie sammeln sich dann in Bereichen an, in denen Wasser aufsteigt oder absinkt, die Stoffe durch ihre andere Dichte aber nicht mitgenommen werden können.

Klicke auf das Bild, um zum Experiment zu gelangen (Link wird am 12. Dezember 2019 freigeschaltet)

Für im Wasser gelöste Stoffe, die passiv im Wasser mittransportiert werden, gibt es viele Prozesse, die für Vermischung sorgen. Zusätzlich zum „Rühren“ durch Wirbel entsteht zum Beispiel auch durch windgetriebene Wellen an der Oberfläche Vermischung.

Klicke auf das Bild, um zum Experiment zu gelangen (Link wird am 13. Dezember 2019 freigeschaltet)

Mitten im Ozean findet Vermischung zwischen zwei Wassermassen oftmals dadurch statt, dass durch Ebbe und Flut angeregte interne Wellen an der Grenzfläche zwischen den Wassermassen auf Tiefseegebirgsketten treffen und dort brechen.

Klicke auf das Bild, um zum Experiment zu gelangen (Link wird am 14. Dezember 2019 freigeschaltet)

Vermischung kann aber auch durch andere Prozesse geschehen, zum Beispiel durch doppeldiffusive Vermischung. Bei doppeldiffusiver Vermischung werden zwei Stoffe vermischt, weil sich die unterschiedlichen Komponenten unterschiedlich schnell vermischen. Es passt sich z.B. Temperatur 100 Mal schneller an die Umgebung an als der Salzgehalt. Das kann zu instabilen Dichteschichtungen und dadurch zu Vertikalbewegungen führen, und die Vertikalbewegungen rühren dann quasi um und vermischen die unterschiedlichen Wassermassen.

Klicke auf das Bild, um zum Experiment zu gelangen (Link wird am 15. Dezember 2019 freigeschaltet)

Doppeldiffusive Vermischung wird im Ozean z.B. an der unteren Grenze des Mittelmeerausstroms beobachtet, wo warmes und salziges Wasser über kälterem und frischerem Wasser liegt. Dort bilden sich sogenannte „Salzfinger“, die für schnellere Vermischung sorgen, als es die molekulare Diffusion alleine könnte.

Klicke auf das Bild, um zum Experiment zu gelangen (Link wird am 16. Dezember 2019 freigeschaltet)

Eine zweite Art der doppeldiffusiven Vermischung wird an der oberen Grenze des Mittelmeerausstroms beobachtet, wo kälteres und weniger salziges über warmem und sehr salzigem Wasser liegt. Hier heißt der Prozess „diffusive layering“ und es bilden sich durch Konvektion homogene Schichten.

Klicke auf das Bild, um zum Experiment zu gelangen (Link wird am 17. Dezember 2019 freigeschaltet)

Diese Art der Schichtung mit kaltem und weniger salzigem Wasser über wärmerem und salzigerem Wasser kommt auch in der Arktis vor. Dort entsteht die Schichtung sowohl durch Niederschlag als auch, wenn Meereis im Sommer schmilzt. Denn auch Eis, das aus salzigem Meerwasser gefroren wurde, besteht beinahe ausschließlich aus Süßwasser.

Klicke auf das Bild, um zum Experiment zu gelangen (Link wird am 18. Dezember 2019 freigeschaltet)

Im Gefrierprozess wird das Salz nämlich „ausgefroren“. Es entsteht eine gleichmäßige Kristallstruktur aus Wassermolekülen, die aber Poren enthält, durch die die Salzlake zum Rand des Eises gedrängt wird und absinkt. Manchmal bleiben aber auch kleine Blasen von konzentrierter Salzlake im Eis erhalten. Meereis hat deshalb eine schwammig aussehende Struktur.

Klicke auf das Bild, um zum Experiment zu gelangen (Link wird am 19. Dezember 2019 freigeschaltet)

Eis kann sich aber nicht nur aus flüssigem Wasser bilden sondern auch aus Wasserdampf. Der Phasenübergang vom gasförmigen zum festen Zustand heißt „Resublimation“ und ist zum Beispiel bei der Bildung von Rauhreif oder Schneeflocken sichtbar.

Klicke auf das Bild, um zum Experiment zu gelangen (Link wird am 20. Dezember 2019 freigeschaltet)

In Regionen, in denen die Temperaturen immer unterhalb des Gefrierpunktes liegen, lagert sich Schnee über viele Jahre in Schichten ab und wird dann über Jahrhunderte zum Gletscher. Die Schichten eines Gletschers werden dabei zu einem Klimaarchiv, weil mit jedem Schneefall auch Informationen, zum Beispiel über Gaskonzentrationen in der Atmosphäre oder Pollen der zu der Zeit blühenden Pflanzen, abgelagert werden.

Klicke auf das Bild, um zum Experiment zu gelangen (Link wird am 21. Dezember 2019 freigeschaltet)

Wenn Gletscher – wie momentan durch den Klimawandel verursacht – abschmelzen, wird Wasser, das seit vielen Jahren nicht am Wasserkreislauf von Niederschlag und Verdunstung teilgenommen hat, weil es im Gletscher gebunden war, wieder diesem Kreislauf zugeführt und landet zum Großteil im Ozean. Der Eintrag dieses zusätzlichen Wassers hat zur Folge, dass der Meeresspiegel ansteigt.

Klicke auf das Bild, um zum Experiment zu gelangen (Link wird am 22. Dezember 2019 freigeschaltet)

Auch Wasser, das bereits als Eis im Ozean schwimmt, schmilzt durch die zunehmend wärmeren Temperaturen der Atmosphäre schneller. Und nicht nur das, auch wärmere Ozeanströmungen nagen von unten am Eis und können zum verstärkten Schmelzen beitragen.

Klicke auf das Bild, um zum Experiment zu gelangen (Link wird am 23. Dezember 2019 freigeschaltet)

Beim Schmelzen von Meereis wird der Meeresspiegel zwar im Gegensatz zum Schmelzen von Gletschern nicht durch den Eintrag von zusätzlichem Wasser erhöht, aber selbst die reine Erwärmung von vorhandenem Wasser trägt zum Meeresspiegelanstieg bei, weil sich Wasser bei Erwärmung ausdehnt.

Klicke auf das Bild, um zum Experiment zu gelangen (Link wird am 24. Dezember 2019 freigeschaltet)

Lust auf noch mehr #KitchenOceanography? Folgt mir auf Twitter (@meermini) und Instagram (@fascinocean_kiel) oder abonniere meinen Blog (https://mirjamglessmer.com/), dann werdet ihr über alle neuen Experimente direkt informiert!

P.S.: Man kann mich für die Entwicklung oder Durchführung von #KitchenOceanography buchen! Kontakt über alle drei oben genannten Kanäle gerne möglich, ich freue mich!