Wave watching 

This is an old picture from early spring, but I just love how the reflection of that pier shows up the different wave lengths so clearly. The longer swell wouldn’t have been visible just from reflections of the sky…

The enormity of waves

It’s easy to forget the enormous size and power associated with waves in the ocean. Yes, we see pictures of surfers on Hawaii or of ships in waves occasionally, but usually we don’t really think about how large waves out in the ocean actually are. Which makes it easy to underestimate the force that the ocean holds within, not only on days when natural disasters like storm surges or tsunamis occur, but on a daily basis, just in the swell of distant storms. So sometimes it is quite healthy to look at waves on the beach and compare them to other buildings.

For example here, waves and Hastings Pier:

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Those aren’t even particularly large waves, yet we see that their wavelength, peak to peak, is easily a lot more than 20m. This is what coastal structures deal with on a daily basis!

Hair-dryer driven surface waves

Looking at wave length, frequency and speed. (deutscher Text unten)

The wave group played with a tank and a hair dryer (the hair dryer safely away from the water, obviously) and different modes of recording. high definition, slow motion and what have you. They also did a really cool data-model comparison, which is still top-secret, but we might reveal it tomorrow. Stay tuned!

Die Wellengruppe hat mit einem Fön (der natürlich in sicherer Entfernung vom Tank war!) Wellen erzeugt und sich die Wellenlänge, Frequenz und Geschwindigkeit angesehen. Sie haben außerdem mit unterschiedlichen Modi der Kamera gespielt: High Definition, Zeitlupe und noch mehr. Sie arbeiten außerdem an einem geheimen Daten-Modellvergleich, von dem wir wahrscheinlich morgen schon berichten werden. Stay tuned!